HomeAbout UsFAQsHow will the Space Force impact me

PERSONNEL

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A: The personnel who belonged to AFSPC are now assigned to the USSF, but currently remain Airmen with the U.S. Air Force. Airmen in select space-related jobs will be transferred into the USSF (becoming members of the USSF) in deliberate manner over the next 18 months, while other Airmen will remain assigned to the USSF in a supporting role.

A: The May 1 - 31 window is for U.S. Air Force members in organic space career fields and common career fields to apply for transfer to the U.S. Space Force. The timeframe for Army/Navy space requirements to move to the Space Force remains in FY22/23. Although legal provisions exist for other services to transfer to the Space Force, the current focus is on transferring the over 6,000 Airmen from the Air Force to the Space Force by mid FY21. We understand there is excitement for Space Force across all services right now. Space Force will release further details for a limited inter-service transfer program for other sister services for FY21.

A: Department of the Air Force members fall into three broad groups, based on their Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC): Organic to the U.S. Space Force; organic to the U.S. Air Force; shared between U.S. Air Force and U.S. Space Force.   

Organic to USSF are those assigned to space operations and space systems operations.  Over time, after we work through the transfer process, positions requiring this expertise will be filled by the USSF, and personnel with this expertise will be organized, trained and equipped by the USSF. 

Shared between USSF and USAF will be intelligence, cyber, acquisitions, and engineers.  There will be positions and people with these sets of expertise in both USAF and USSF.  USSF and USAF will build capability to organize, train and equip individuals with this expertise and will be required to provide Combatant Commanders with this capability. 

Organic to USAF are the remaining specialties.  The Air Force will retain responsibility to organize, train and equip these Airmen and provide this expertise and capability to Combatant Commanders. 

Members are part of the 6th branch of the Armed Forces (the U.S. Space Force) once they have been transferred either through a new appointment for officers or by being enlisted into the U.S. Space Force.  The Department of the Air Force will go through a deliberate process and will provide information to individuals to help guide their decision to transfer into the U.S. Space Force. 
 

A: The Department of the Air Force follows applicable laws and policies to transfer members into the U.S. Space Force.  This includes offering individuals an opportunity to volunteer and be selected for transfer into the U.S. Space Force.  Until transferred, Air Force personnel are continuing to execute the space mission as Airmen assigned to those designated units that move to the U.S. Space Force.  All members will receive information on the next steps of the transfer strategy.   
 
A: Air Force civilians in units that move to the U.S. Space Force remain Department of the Air Force employees.  All provisions of law and polices affecting civilians will remain the same.  There is no change to pay, benefits, or retirement.   
 

A: Yes, there is a difference. An “assigned” individual is a person who performs work in support of a specific mission, in this case the U.S. Space Force. A “transferred” individual in this situation is someone who has changed their enlistment or appointment as an officer from one particular branch of the Armed Forces to another.

This will be similar to how we approach manning for Combatant Commands and Joint Organizations where members are “assigned” to the organization on expertise to support the mission. These individuals receive day-to-day direction from the Combatant Command or Joint Organization, but their administrative control (e.g., their authority to be promoted or disciplined) falls within the Service in which they enlisted or were appointed as an officer.

In the long term, U.S. Space Force organizations will need to be manned with individuals from the 6th Armed Forces branch (the U.S. Space Force), since it will have organic capability in space operations, intelligence, acquisition and other operational support specialties. It will also need significant support from the U.S. Air Force for things like base operating support, logistics, medical, dental and legal.

A: No, there is no change to pay and allowances or benefits for service members who transfer to the U.S. Space Force.  Service members who transfer without a break in service will retain their benefits, including retirement plan and thrift savings benefits. 
 
A: Yes – all members transferring into the U.S. Space Force retain their existing grade. 
 
A: In the near term, service members who prefer to stay in the Air Force, even if they have an Air Force Specialty Code that will be organic to the Space Force, will be retained. Over time, members whose specialty is organic to the Space Force either need to transfer to the Space Force, retrain into a specialty in the Air Force, or separate/retire. Individuals who are in shared AFSCs will be able to stay in the Air Force, but they may be assigned to support Space Force missions and organizations.

A: Personnel are transferred in the same status (grade, duty, and pay status) that they had prior to transfer.  There will be no penalty for transferring to the Space Force, and it will not affect time-in-grade or retirement eligibility.   
 
A: There are no plans at this time for a U.S. Space Force specific service academy.  We expect to commission officers from existing service academies, Reserve Officer Training Corps programs, and Officer Candidate Schools into the U.S. Space Force.  It’s important to note that the Air Force Academy and other commissioning services are already commissioning space-minded officers.  
 
A: At this time, the Space Force has the same grade structure as the other military services (i.e., E-1 - E-9, O-1 - O-10 and incoming members will retain their current specific rank (e.g., Staff Sergeant, Major, etc.). No decisions have been made at this time on whether there will be any future changes.

A: Throughout the next year, the Department of the Air Force will determine career and accession paths for military and civilian personnel assigned or wanting to be assigned to U.S. Space Force.  While the exact process of joining the U.S. Space Force is still being developed, anyone interested in joining the U.S. Space Force should look at current Air Force space-focused career fields such as Space Operations or Space Systems Maintenance.  
 

ORGANIZATIONAL & CULTURE

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A: The organization, Air Force Space Command, was redesignated as the U.S. Space Force.
 
A: The Space Force is the newest branch of the Armed Forces – like the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines – that is responsible for organizing, training, and equipping forces for the space domain. U.S. Space Command (USSPACECOM) is the newest of eleven different Combatant Commands responsible for planning and conducting all military operations in a specific geographic or functional area or domain – in this case, the space domain.

A: Only Congress can establish a Space Guard and Space Reserve as new reserve components of the armed forces.  Until such establishment, existing Guard and Reserve remain critical to the space mission performed by the U.S. military today.  Air Guard and Reserve units will be aligned to the U.S. Space Force as directed by the Secretary of the Air Force.  The Department of the Air Force will provide to the Congressional defense committees a total force management plan in support of the U.S. Space Force no later than 90 days after the establishment of the USSF. 
 
A: The OCPs are the utility uniform of the Army and Air Force and as such, it is the utility uniform of space operators in both services.  OCPs are the utility uniform of the U.S. Space Force although like the other services, we will have a distinctive thread color.  Currently, there is not a separate service dress uniform, rank structure or official name for members serving in the Space Force.  Due to the importance of these symbols of service identify and culture, we are following a deliberate design process to ensure we accurately represent the excellence and heritage of the men and women of the U.S. Space Force.
 
A: The U.S. Space Force official seal was unveiled on Jan. 24, 2020. The U.S. Space Force logo is being developed, and we look forward to unveiling it in the near future.

Road Show FAQs

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A: Personnel in the 13S and 1C6 career fields will transfer into the Space Force if they volunteer and meet the eligibility criteria mentioned in this presentation.

A: Initial transfers will only be for the Space Organic and Common AFSCs with no retraining options. For example, if you are a 13S or a 3D1, you will transfer into the Space Force as a 13S or 3D1.

A: Individuals who transfer to the Space Force will take their line numbers with them.

A: Transferring to the Space Force does not mean that you will automatically get a new assignment. Assignments will be worked on a case-by-case basis after an individual transfers. Considerations will include time remaining on current assignment, needs of the individual and needs of the Space Force.

A: All 13S and 1C6 requirements will transfer to the Space Force. Those who do not transfer may apply for retraining or cross-flow opportunities through existing programs, or apply for separation or retirement if eligible. The transition period for organic space specialties is 2 years, which means those choosing none of the aforementioned options can serve as Airmen in space missions for up to 2 years until these career fields are deleted from the Air Force inventory.

A: For officers, Core ID will be used. For enlisted, the Control AFSC will be used. For enlisted, personnel in DSD-like assignments , we will identify eligibility based on the Control AFSC help prior to the DSD assignment.

A: There will be no cap on the number of personnel in the Space Operations career fields allowed to transfer to the Space Force. For personnel in the common AFSCs, however, there will likely be a need to limit the number of people who transfer in order to ensure both the Air Force and the Space Force have the number of personnel to meet mission needs and career sustainment. The requirements for common AFSCs are still being determined.

A: Only Congress can establish a Space Guard and Space Reserve as new reserve components of the armed forces. Until such establishment, existing Guard and Reserve remain critical to the space mission performed by the U.S. military today. Air Guard and Reserve units will be aligned to the U.S. Space Force as directed by the Secretary of the Air Force.

A: Yes, the Space Force S1 is working with Air Force and Space Force Functional Leaders to provide tailored information in the near future.

A: At this time, there are 2 designated transfer opportunities in 2020 – one for Organic Space and one for Common AFSCs.

TRANSFERRING TO THE SPACE FORCE

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A: The required 2-year ADSC for transfer to a new service starts upon your first day of entering into the Space Force. For example, the date an enlisted member signs his / her enlistment contract and is sworn into the Space Force is the date their ADSC begins.

A: Yes, the Air Force and Space Force will each maintain what we term Common AFSCs. Therefore, once personnel are transferred into the Space Force, they would have to apply through the inter-service transfer process to change back.

A: They will remain in the Air Force, but there may be opportunities to support Space Force as assigned Air Force assets.

A: For officers, the CORE ID will be used. For enlisted, the CAFSC will be used. Also for enlisted, since DSD-like assignments (8 and 9 series AFSCs) create a new CAFSC, those who's AFSC prior to the DSD assignment was one of the eligible AFSCs to transfer are also eligible to apply.

A: Those who do not transfer may apply for retraining or cross-flow opportunities through existing programs, or apply for separation or retirement if eligible. The transition period for organic space specialties is 2 years, which means those choosing none of the aforementioned options can serve as Airmen in space missions for up to 2 years until these career fields are deleted from the Air Force inventory.

A: Transfer boards only apply to the Common AFSCs. Board results will go to Senior Raters and Commanders approximately two months after the last board is completed.

A: One. All 13S and 1C6 requirements will transfer to the Space Force. Those who do not transfer may apply for retraining or cross-flow opportunities through existing programs, or apply for separation or retirement if eligible. The transition period for organic space specialties is 2 years, which means those choosing none of the aforementioned options can serve as Airmen in space missions for up to 2 years until these career fields are deleted from the Air Force inventory.

A: If someone elects to transfer to the Space Force, the line number will transfer into the new Service. Transfer will not occur until the promotion results are properly approved.

A: GI Bill benefits will not be impacted by transfer. By law all enlisted who transfer into another Service are required to serve 2 years in that new Service. Enlistment contracts can be from 2 - 8 years. For officers, we are requiring the same minimum service commitment of 2 years to be equitable between the ranks. Current service commitments would be serviced concurrently.

A: Transferring personnel will carry their line numbers into the Space Force.

A: Officers selectively continued, are continued to Retirement. Those in continued status will be allowed to transfer as long as they have at least 2 years remaining before retirement. If you have less than two years remaining in continued status, than you will not be allowed to transfer.

A: No, continue to transfer, if you volunteer; the transfer process will not interfere with any developmental or promotion opportunities.

A: At this time, only those with a CORE ID of 13S will transfer. Space Force will develop its own Inter-Service Transfer programs some time in the future.

A: No.

A: At this time, there is no program for non-USSF career fields to crossflow or retrain into the Space Force. Space Force will develop its own programs some time in the future.

A: By law all enlisted who transfer into another Service are required to serve 2 years in that new Service. Enlistment contracts can be from 2 - 8 years. For officers, we are requiring the same minimum service commitment of 2 years to be equitable between the ranks. Current service commitments would be serviced concurrently.

A: Initially, Space Force personnel selected for Officer Training School are expected to fulfill Space Force officer requirements. However, you could eventually apply through the inter-service transfer process that exists today.

A: The Chief of Space Operations is moving quickly toward establishing an independent command screening and matching process for Space Force units. For FY20, those in Common AFSCs who selected to command will be expected to fulfill their command tour. Those in organic Space Force AFSCs may be released to command units on a case-by-case situation.

A: By law all enlisted who transfer into another Service are required to serve 2 years in that new Service. Enlistment contracts can be from 2 - 8 years. For officers, we are requiring the same minimum service commitment of 2 years to be equitable between the ranks. Any prior ADSCs will be served concurrently.

A: Yes, there will be a timeline provided for individuals to decline to transfer.

A: By law all enlisted who transfer into another Service are required to serve 2 years in that new Service. Enlistment contracts can be from 2 - 8 years. For officers, we are requiring the same minimum service commitment of 2 years to be equitable between the ranks. Exceptions to policy to retire prior to completing this commitment will follow policies and procedures established by the Space Force.

A: Space Force will determine assignments to the Air Force in the future.

A: If you have an established DOS, you will serve in your current capacity until separated.

A: The window for Organic Space and Common AFSCs to volunteer to transfer is between May 1 - 31, 2020. The Space Force will develop its own Inter-Service Transfer programs some time in the future.

A: If you are in an organic space career field, your best opportunity to continue to serve in the military is to transfer to the Space Force. You can apply to crossflow into another Air Force career field like pilot; however, there is not guarantee you will be selected.

A: A transfer does not equate to a PCS. Assignments post-transfer will be worked on a case by case basis.

A: DAF civilians will continue to be assigned to support Space Force missions. Please see USAJOBS for contracting opportunities.

A: For Space Force organic AFSCs, there will be no arbitrary limit to the number of personnel allowed to transfer to the Space Force. We anticipate that most, if not all, who are eligible to transfer will apply to do so. For Common AFSCs there will likely be a need to limit the number of people who transfer in order to ensure both the Air Force and the Space Force have the number of personnel in the common AFSCs for mission needs and career sustainment. The requirements are still being determined.

A: Department of the Air Force leadership made a determination as to which specialties would initially transfer to the Space Force. Once those transfers are complete, the Space Force will assess its requirements and work with the Air Force to open transfer opportunities to other career fields as needed. The Air Force continues to provide critical capabilities that do not transfer to the Space Force.

A: All 13S and 1C6 will be transferring to the Space Force beginning Sept. 1, 2020. They will be followed by the Common AFSCs beginning Feb. 1, 2021. Location does not determine priority of transfer.

A: The board process details are still in development and will be released prior to the Common AFSC volunteer period. Board membership will consist of Space and Air Force leaders with representation from both common and organic career areas. For enlisted boards, there will be representation from a Colonel and two CMSgts.

A: The organic space missions are fully transferring to the Space Force, and there will be limited opportunities for organic space personnel who do not transfer. Those who do not transfer may apply for retraining or cross-flow opportunities through existing programs, or apply for separation or retirement if eligible. The transition period for organic space specialties is 2 years, which means those choosing none of the aforementioned options can serve as Airmen in space missions for up to 2 years until these career fields are deleted from the Air Force inventory.

A: They remain in the Air Force.

A: If an individual is eligible and volunteers to transfer, then HYT waivers will be considered to enable the member to complete the required 2 year service commitment.

A: This decision is up to leadership; however, ceremonies for this momentous occasion are encouraged.

A: Yes, they will still be eligible to apply. For officers, the CORE ID will be used. For enlisted, the CAFSC will be used. Also for enlisted, since DSD-like assignments (8 and 9 series AFSCs) create a new CAFSC, those who's AFSC prior to the DSD assignment was one of the eligible AFSCs to transfer are also eligible to apply.

A: Standard Air Force policies and procedures remain in effect.

A: Initially transfers will only be for the Space Organic and Common AFSCs with no retraining options. For example, if you are a 13S or a 3D1, you will transfer into the Space Force as a 13S or 3D1.

A: Individuals who transfer into the Space Force will separate from the Air Force on one day, and will enlist or be appointed into the Space Force on the next day.

A: Organic Space (13S and 1C6) and Common AFSCs (14N, 17X, 62E, 63A, 1N0, 1N1, 1N2, 1N4, 1N8, 3D0 and 3D1).

A: Organic Space (1C6) and Common AFSCs (1N0, 1N1, 1N2, 1N4, 1N8, 3D0 and 3D1). Air Force policies and procedures remain in effect for Space Force at this time.

A: Department of the Air Force leadership made a determination as to which specialties would initially transfer to the Space Force. Once those transfers are complete, the Space Force will assess its requirements and work with the Air Force to open transfer opportunities to other career fields as needed. The Air Force continues to provide critical capabilities that do not transfer to the Space Force.

A: Transfer to the Space Force is not dependent on location of assignment. In the case of a joint billet, the member would transfer to the Space Force and be allowed to complete the assignment to receive joint credit.

A: If you wish to join the Space Force, apply. Any Air Force ADSC will be concurrent with service in the Space Force.

A: No, a failed fitness test or derogatory information will not make someone ineligible for transfer. However, if a Common AFSC, this will be part of what the board reviews.

A: Assignments will not prohibit a transfer.

A: Initally all Air Force policies will apply to Space Force; however, expect the Space Force to determine its approach to timing between PCS soon.

A: No, TAPS will not be required in the case.

A: Organic Air Force AFSCs (64P, 6C0, 31P, 3P0, 1B4, 65W, 65F, 6F0, 61A, 61D, 2M0, 38F, and 3FX) have opportunities to be assigned to Space Force units, but as of now will not have the option to transfer services. After organic space and common AFSCs transfer, the Space Force will evaluate mission requirements and develop an inter-service transfer program for anyone to apply for transfer.

A: If Senior Leaders are Colonels and Chiefs, then they are included in all published transfer policy. General Officers are being worked by OCSO leadership.

A: Yes, we are working with Space Force and the Functional Communities to establish detailed information.

A: By law all enlisted who transfer into another Service are required to serve 2 years in that new Service. Enlistment contracts can be from 2 - 8 years. For officers, we are requiring the same minimum service commitment of 2 years to be equitable between the ranks.

A: At this time, there is only the May 2020 window. All 13S and 1C6 requirements will transfer to the Space Force. Those who do not transfer may apply for retraining or cross-flow opportunities through existing programs, or apply for separation or retirement if eligible. The transition period for organic space specialties is 2 years, which means those choosing none of the aforementioned options can serve as Airmen in space missions for up to 2 years until these career fields are deleted from the Air Force inventory.

A: Department of the Air Force leadership made a determination as to which specialties would initially transfer to the Space Force. Once those transfers are complete, the Space Force will assess its requirements and work with the Air Force to open transfer opportunities to other career fields as needed. The Air Force continues to provide critical capabilities that do not transfer to the Space Force.

A: Eligible personnel in Organic Space or Common AFSCs will receive a targeted email to volunteer for the Space Force regardless of assigned location. We will also advertise the application window through as many mediums as possible and contact unit commanders as well. If you are aware of an individual in an organic space AFSC, please have them contact AFPC.

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